I Want You To Want Me explores the search for love and self in the world of online dating.

Jonathan Harris’s & Sep Kamvar’s most recent visualization project “I want you to want me“, explores the search for love and self in the world of online dating. Created for the Design and the Elastic Mind exhibition at MoMA.

I Want You To Want Me chronicles the world’s long-term relationship with romance, across all ages, genders, and sexualities, gathering new data from a variety of online dating sites every few hours. The system searches these sites for certain phrases, which it then collects and stores in a database. These phrases, taken out of context, provide partial glimpses into people’s private lives. Simultaneously, the system forms an evolving zeitgeist of dating, tracking the most popular first dates, turn-ons, desires, self-descriptions and interests.

The data is presented as an interactive installation, displayed on a 56” high-resolution touch screen, hung vertically on a wall in a dark room. On screen is an interactive sky, whose weather (sunny, cloudy, rainy, snowy, etc.) can be controlled by the viewer. Through the sky float hundreds of blue (male) and pink (female) balloons, each representing a single dating profile. The brighter balloons are younger people; the darker balloons older. Trapped inside each balloon is one of over 500 video silhouettes, showing a solitary person, engaged in any number of activities (yoga, jumping jacks, nose-picking, air guitar, etc.). The viewer can touch any balloon to select it, causing its photo to dangle from a string and its sentence to appear in a thought bubble overhead. Touching any balloon a second time pops it. The balloons move through the sky along different paths and at different speeds, bumping up against each other, sometimes traveling together for a time, but only ever getting so close, as each silhouette is ultimately confined to its own balloon.

Advertisements

Right Place : Awesome Japanese [very] short movie

Via Digg, found this great short movie called “Right Place” at YouTube, directed by Kosai Sakine

 

 

Right Place is an ‘almost silent’, five and a half minute movie. It tells the story of a young man with OCD, for whom working in a late-night convenience store is patently not a suitable career path. Walking home in the rain after being thrown out of his job, he finally discovers the right place in life that he’s been searching for …

Right Place” was reported by “shots” as the most highly praised film at Asia-Pacific Advertising Festival in 2005. The showcase was held under the sponsorship of JAC (Japan Association of TV commercial Companies); young directors from five countries made films on the theme of “Fear No Change”.

Shattered Still Life

Martin Klimas takes ’still life’ pictures of ceramic figures, taken as they’re being destroyed! From The Morning Life

Martin Klimas destroys a lot of clay to make his art. Combining the silence of Eadweard Muybridge’s horse pictures with the association-rich composition of a still life, Klimas breaks recognizable objects so they become something else, and stops us just at the moment of transformation.

03b

The aspect of destroying is not the most important one in my work. Let’s say it is a catalyst to unleash and study this transformation. The hardest part of my work is to smash so many figurines until I find one that truly is showing me something new. I am in that sense a sculptor, but I have only a 5000th of a second to build my sculpture.

Can shattered real-life be an art-form too?

Timeless beauties – Women in Art and Film

Women In Art by Eggman913

A mesmerizing video portraying 500 years of females in Western Art. Cool neat morphing between the images. The creator of the video did a good work of encapsulating different styles which make the presentation more interesting. Sometimes the transition creates interesting effects.


Women In Film by Eggman913

Another one showcasing 80 years of female portraits in cinema.

Follow the eyes for an enchanting effect! 🙂